How the Eglinton Crosstown LRT construction is changing midtown in 18 photos


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Eglinton W. and the Allen Rd. has been one of the hubs of construction activity.

Image: Libby Roach

Construction for the 25-km long Eglinton Crosstown LRT isn’t scheduled to wrap up until 2020, but the project is already having a noticeable impact on Toronto’s midtown neighbourhood.


Many lanes are closed. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


At some points it can be difficult to tell exactly which lanes are closed. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


In some cases, it looks like almost all of the lanes are closed. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH) 

 


With closed sidewalks, pedestrians have also felt the pinch. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


The most obvious outcome of construction and closed lanes is increased travel times. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


Chains have, by no means, been immune to having to close locations. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


That includes one of the biggest chains of all. This is the McDonalds at Eglinton and Bayview. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


To Metrolinx’s credit they have installed plenty of signs to explain why so many businesses are closed. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


Giving the stations names was the big to-do for Metrolinx in 2015. This is actually the future home of Forest Hill Station. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


Schools, like Leaside H.S., soldier on. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


Long-time standy King Falafel is asking for your help with memories. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


Some of the businesses are sticking it out — I Went to Philly is still serving sandwiches. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


Even restaurants that have been on Eglinton for decades have had to make way. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


It’s not just restaurants that are moving, either. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


Huge construction structures have become a fixture at many points on Eglinton. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


For a few stretches the construction equipment is taller than any other structure. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

 


This closed storefront on Bayview is a sign that it isn't only Eglinton businesses feeling the effect. (IMAGE: LIBBY ROACH)

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Libby Roach is a born and raised Toronto girl. When she's not gallivanting around eating, shooting and writing about food you'll find her running around the city in an attempt to stave off type one diabetes. Follow her on Twitter @libbyroach1 and Instagram @cookiespi. Her website is LibbyRoach.ca

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