Spring is going to mean traffic woes for Midtown with five new construction sites

Will locals feel trapped when trucks, hoarding and traffic take over the area?


Published:

Stavros Rougas stands at Redpath and Roehampton as workers direct traffic

Traffic in the Yonge Street and Eglinton Avenue area has taken another hit: at least five construction staging proposals for the area were approved by the City of Toronto last month. Work on the Eglinton Crosstown LRT station is underway, while the construction plan for a 35-storey condo at 18-30 Erskine Ave. is under fire from parents of the adjacent John Fisher Public School. Construction is slated to begin this summer, and locals are already concerned about safety. 

“Do you know how many times construction trucks park on the sidewalk?” said Stavros Rougas, a parent whose child attends John Fisher. “All the time. And if one just happens to be rolling backwards and forwards and there are kids around, they might not see them.” 

Parents are also concerned about the amount of public space construction will take up, alongside school buses, student pickups, pedestrians and everyday traffic. 

South of the school, the construction plan for 99 Broadway Ave. will close the south sidewalk and part of the eastbound lane of Broadway Avenue until 2020. For 151 Roehampton Ave., part of the sidewalk and south curb lane will be subject to closure until 2018. Construction for 125 Redpath Ave. and 197 Redpath Ave. will close portions of the east sidewalk and the northbound lane on Redpath Avenue until 2020. Factor in the ongoing construction for the Eglinton Crosstown LRT until 2021 and you’ve got traffic hell in a tight residential area with no clear end in sight. 

“We wish we could do it without disrupting people,” said Anne Khan, manager of traffic operations, Toronto & East York District, City of Toronto. “Our goal is to maintain one lane of traffic in each direction as well as maintaining pedestrian and cycling connection where needed.”

The city’s provisions for emergency vehicles also require lanes to be wide enough to fit trucks and ambulances, even in areas with construction staging in place. In the event of an emergency, the city would be forced to close these streets to accommodate emergency vehicles.

“There’s no easy answer for a complex urban area like Yonge and Eglinton. It’s a process we’re working on,” said Cassidy Ritz, a City of Toronto planner. Ritz and her colleagues continue to work on the city’s Midtown in Focus study, which aims to address intensification in the area. 

Edit Module

Join the conversation and have your say by commenting below. Our comment system uses a Facebook plugin. Please note that you'll have to turn off some ad-blockers in order to see the comments.

Edit Module

Follow us on Twitter @PostCity for more on what to eat, where to shop and what to do in Toronto.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

You may also like...

How creating graphic novels helped one Toronto teen thrive

How creating graphic novels helped one Toronto teen thrive

For Evi Tampold, dealing with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as a child was both a curse and a blessing. A curse because she grew up with frustrating bouts of hyperactivity and rage, and a blessing because it drew her to the world of graphic novels.
Posted 16 hours ago
Daily Planet: Why we need to stop using plastic straws

Daily Planet: Why we need to stop using plastic straws

It may not seem like a big deal, but it is. In the U.S. alone, people discard 500 million straws every day or more than 180 billion a year. That’s about 1.4 million kilograms of plastic sent to landfills and oceans every day!
Posted 19 hours ago
From towers to townhouses: A Richmond Hill highrise development gets a major scale back

From towers to townhouses: A Richmond Hill highrise development gets a major scale back

After four years of development limbo, an original proposal for two residential towers at 370 Red Maple Rd. has been resubmitted as a reduced plan for a townhouse development, slashing the number of units by 74 per cent and the height from 16 and 18 storeys high to three-storey townhouses.
Posted 5 days ago
Unique sidewalk letters hit third T.O. neighbourhood

Unique sidewalk letters hit third T.O. neighbourhood

Toronto artist Victor Fraser sets himself apart from the conventions of street art, inviting the public to watch him in the process of creating instead of simply observing a static image. And his unique works have been spotted in neighbourhoods throughout the city, including new findings in the Beaches.
Posted 5 days ago
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleEdit Module