The good, bad and bizarre from April in Toronto


Published:

Kevin O’Leary the failed candidate for Conservative Party of Canada leadership

The good:
Toronto city council, backed by the family of the late documentary filmmaker Rob Stewart, voted in favour of pushing the federal government to enact a ban on shark fin imports. Stewart spent his career fighting to save sharks from extinction, and it ultimately cost him his life when he drowned earlier this year while filming the sequel to his film Sharkwater. The first attempt at a citywide ban was foiled in 2012 when a judge ruled that the city didn’t have the power to ban the sale of shark fins, which are legal.

The bad:
A recent report authored by Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) revealed that Toronto District School Board’s (TDSB) four publicly funded arts high schools have a serious inequality issue. According to OISE, students are twice as likely to be white and from wealthy neighbourhoods. The study, which looked at three of the four arts programs at the Grade 9 level, states that 67 per cent of students are white. TDSB operates four arts schools: Wexford Collegiate, Claude Watson, Rosedale Heights and Etobicoke.

The bizarre:
One of the weirdest marketing exercises in recent history ended in late April when Kevin O’Leary finally withdrew his candidacy for the leadership of the Conservative Party of Canada. Apparently, O’Leary came to realize that his inability to speak our country’s other official language would alienate an entire province full of voters, which might negatively impact his electoral prospects moving forward. Ya think? At least he got millions of dollars worth of free exposure here and in the United States: you know, where he lives.

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