Barry's Bootcamp opens their biggest location to date in Toronto


Published:

Somewhere in the middle of my first class at the brand new Barry’s Bootcamp location in Toronto my instructor reminds me of a rather important point:

“You didn’t come here for easy!”

No, I didn’t.

And really, few people haul themselves to a gym for “easy” anymore. What I and a growing number of people are looking for from their workouts is efficient, effective and most likely transformative. Get in, get fit, get out and get on with the day.

 

This is the essence of what Barry’s Bootcamp has been offering for almost 20 years at locations throughout the U.S., the U.A.E. and Europe. Now, their biggest studio to date has opened in Toronto in the quickly evolving Entertainment District and it’s already gaining a following. The studio had been open for three days when I was there, and there were a few people who mentioned they had already done a few classes.

Barry’s workouts change constantly but are based on speed and incline intervals on the treadmill interspersed with floor intervals of targeted strength exercises. The combination ends up being 25-30 minutes of each in the one-hour class.

 

There are full-body strength days, abs and arms, legs and butt, and so on. If for whatever reason you’d prefer to skip the treadmill, there is an option to do a “double floor” class.

Beginners don’t have to worry — while the instructors give you suggestions for your treadmill settings and what weights you should be lifting, it is entirely up to you. There were at least a few people that walked the treadmill intervals during my class, and that is just fine because that is what worked for them.

 

Once inside Barry’s signature dimly-lit, red room with catchy playlist and Barry’s very fit, friendly and motivating instructors, it’s easy to get swept up in the energy of the class and push a little out of one’s comfort zone. That is exactly where you want to be if you are working on improving overall fitness. It may not be as much targeted attention as a personal trainer, but it’s a very results-oriented workout, and excellent if you are driven by the group atmosphere. It’s also likely to be less expensive.

There is also stretch class on offer called RELEASE, which is just the thing you’ll need after a few of Barry’s regular classes (trust me). Take the luxurious facilities and add towels, and a smoothie snack bar with recovery nutrients in mind, and it’s all a very attractive package.

Prices are single classes for $32, five classes for $155, 10 for $300, or 50 for $1360.

Barry’s Bootcamp Toronto, 310 Richmond St. W., Unit 1, 647-631-2287

Edit Module

Join the conversation and have your say by commenting below. Our comment system uses a Facebook plugin. Please note that you'll have to turn off some ad-blockers in order to see the comments.

Edit Module

Michelle Jobin is a TV host, producer, writer, and Stott Certified Pilates instructor based in Toronto. She is fitness, travel, style and food obsessed.  For more of her musing on these subjects and beyond, follow her on Instagram @michelle.jobin  Twitter @michellejobin or visit her website at mlchelllejobin.com

Edit ModuleShow Tags

You may also like...

Five new Toronto comics ready for their breakout year in 2018

Five new Toronto comics ready for their breakout year in 2018

Mark Breslin shares his picks for the next big things in comedy.
Posted 3 days ago
Putting it bluntly: We chatted to a real estate broker who smokes pot daily

Putting it bluntly: We chatted to a real estate broker who smokes pot daily

'Michael' agreed to meet with me, smoke a joint and talk about what the coming of legalization might mean to him.
Posted 4 days ago
4 top financial planners on big money mistakes, RRSPs and the best investment they ever made

4 top financial planners on big money mistakes, RRSPs and the best investment they ever made

With RRSP-contribution season is in full swing, Torontonians are looking for financial advice.
Posted 4 days ago
Daily Planet: Whatever happened to hand-me-downs?

Daily Planet: Whatever happened to hand-me-downs?

How did “throw away,” “disposable” and “planned obsolescence” become part of product design and marketing?
Posted 5 days ago
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleEdit Module