Nøgne Ø. For as long as supplies last, we’ll have the chance to try five different selections from Norway’s best-known craft brewery. ">

First Draught: a beer from Norway’s top craft brewery


Published:

Nøgne Ø: strange characters, good beer (Image: David Ort)

Aficionados of Scandinavian food and drink — they are everywhere these days — will be thrilled to see that the LCBO has joined the parade by featuring Nøgne Ø. For as long as supplies last, we’ll have the chance to try five different selections from Norway’s best-known craft brewery. 

The brewery’s name means “naked island,” a term that Henrik Ibsen used to evoke the bleakness of the rocky outcroppings that stand off from Norway’s south coast.  

One of the standouts is the #100 American-style barley wine. The beer’s name seems to deserve an explanation just as much as the brewery’s, but it merely signifies that this beer was first brewed to celebrate the brewery’s 100th batch. 

At 10 per cent alcohol, this beer is particularly attractive because there is enough preservative alcohol to make it suitable for a year (or more) of home cellaring.

Dipping my nose into a glass of the #100, I get the sweet aroma of freshly baked butter tarts with a heavy pinch of lemon zest. Tipping it up for a sip, the malty sweetness is still there, but it takes a back seat to assertive American hops (Centennial, Columbus and Chinook), with their familiar notes of pink grapefruit pith and a touch of pine resin. 

The other Nøgne Ø beers are excellent as well. The Tiger Tripel is a skilled rendering of a complex style, and with its clove and banana notes, it’s a good reminder of sunnier times. Christmas cheer is supplied by the Underlig Jul (Norwegian for “peculiar yule”), which could only be made more festive by doing this.

Nøgne Ø #100, $6.55 for a 500 mL bottle, LCBO #296293

In addition to covering beer, new restaurants and food trucks for Post City, David writes about food and drink for several Toronto publications including Spotlight Toronto and his own site, Food With Legs. For more of his thoughts on food, beer and life in general, follow him on Twitter.

Edit Module

Join the conversation and have your say by commenting below. Our comment system uses a Facebook plugin. Please note that you'll have to turn off some ad-blockers in order to see the comments.

Edit Module

Follow us on Twitter @PostCity for more on what to eat, where to shop and what to do in Toronto.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

You may also like...

An L.A. import in Parkdale and Doug McNish are turning vegan food into the hottest grub in town

An L.A. import in Parkdale and Doug McNish are turning vegan food into the hottest grub in town

Last year’s Toronto Vegan Food and Drink fest first intro’d locals to the resto, and since day one, the narrow space has been packed. Outside, hordes of cool kids in vegan (and real) leather jackets lounge, waiting for the two-hour queue to dissipate.
Posted 17 hours ago
First Look: Dirty Bird lands in the Annex

First Look: Dirty Bird lands in the Annex

Kensington Market staple The Dirty Bird has opened a new outpost. The new location at Bloor and Bathurst can seat 29, which is nearly double the size of their previous spot.
Posted 1 day ago
What to Eat this Minute: Taiwanese toast is a lesson in decadence

What to Eat this Minute: Taiwanese toast is a lesson in decadence

Thick-cut bread doused in ice cream and strawberry sauce at Petit Potato.
Posted 2 days ago
Restaurant Update: Brandon Olsen’s new chocolate shop opens, and chef Ben Heaton heads up La Société

Restaurant Update: Brandon Olsen’s new chocolate shop opens, and chef Ben Heaton heads up La Société

It’s cottage season, but there’s lots of new stuff to explore in the city if you’re stuck here.
Posted 4 days ago
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleEdit Module