May 2012


East Coast wrap stars: Toronto gets collectively obsessed with the Halifax-style donair

Canadian food is disgusting. As a nation, we are stoically proud of this fact. Few countries are as talented at taking gross food and making it even more gross than it was previously. We think tomato juice should have clam juice mixed into it. Our French fries come drenched in gravy, with cheese curds that squeak. And when a pita wrap is put into the hands of a Nova Scotian, it ends up drowned in a sauce that’s so sweet it simply defies common sense.

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Dear sake: thank you for being awesome

One good thing about globalization is that the sake available in Toronto these days is no longer solely limited to the poorest examples of Japan’s national liquor. If the only sake you’ve ever tried has been the “house sake” at the nearest all-you-can-eat sushi joint, then you haven’t had sake. In honour of Kampai Toronto’s Festival of Sake, this evening at The Distillery District, we offer you seven reasons to make sake your drink of choice.

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First Draught: two seasonal beers from Muskoka Brewery to bridge the gap between spring and summer

No one drinks rosé between October and April, but wine is otherwise less weather-dependent than beer. Already, two of my five First Draught posts have profiled seasonals — beers that breweries only make and sell at a certain time of year.

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Modernist Cuisine at Home brings cooking arch-geekery to the home kitchen

The monolithic Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking — a 50-pound, six-volume encyclopedia featuring 2,400 pages of elaborate cooking lore — will soon be adding another robust recipe-repository to its high-end cookbook family. Capitalizing on the surprising commercial success of its big brother, the upcoming Modernist Cuisine At Home moves away from the restaurant industry and towards the home kitchen, designed to “set a new standard for home cookbooks.”

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Grand Electric opens its patio; getting into Grand Electric becomes moderately feasible

We’ve been eagerly awaiting the opening of Grand Electric’s patio for weeks now, and Corey Mintz reports that it finally happened over the past weekend. The restaurant’s 40-seat capacity — combined with sweet tacos — meant that wait times to get into the place often exceeded two hours. With the new patio, the capacity hits 100, and wait times are apparently down to 45 minutes or less.

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Toronto’s Soho House: a five-point primer

Members of Toronto’s artsy elite are finally being offered a taste of international exclusivity. Come September, there’ll be no more need to slum it in public venues or to rub shoulders with the plebs. Why? Because Toronto is finally getting its very own Soho House, timed perfectly to coincide with this year’s TIFF festivities.

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First Look: The Feasting Room, a temporary nose-to-tail restaurant concept on College Street

These days, hip Toronto restaurants either temporarily pop up at under-the-radar locations or serve copious amounts of off-cut animal bits. The Feasting Room does both. The project of chef/owner Noah Goldberg and general manager Mathieu Dutan, this new restaurant will see tables at Little Italy’s The Orbit Room decked out in butcher paper, wine glasses and pimped-out offal for the next six months or so.

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Toronto’s Best Sandwiches: The County General’s fried chicken thigh sandwich

Queen West’s much-ballyhooed The County General serves up comfort fare fit for just about everyone — if you can snag a seat. Attracting an endless stream of noshers, the long ‘n’ lean eatery features a row of blonde wood tables decked out in homey blue-and-white gingham napkins. The space makes for a rather convivial dining experience, and by the end of it, you may have just buddied up with the kid to the left.

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Chef Tom Brodi parts ways with TOCA

Last February, TOCA opened its doors at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel, riding on a tidal wave of high expectations. At its helm was acclaimed chef Tom Brodi, whose ten years at Canoe, the big daddy of Toronto fine dining, had left foodies salivating with anticipation over his newest venture.

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Introducing Post City’s new restaurant critic: the one and only Joanne Kates

It wasn’t without a bit of sentimentality (okay, a lot of sentimentality) that Joanne Kates announced her retirement from The Globe and Mail after 38 years as the newspaper’s restaurant critic. Still, Kates never intended to remain silent, which is why we’re pleased to announce that she’ll be doing two restaurant reviews for us each month.

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