Centre for Social Innovation, the Food Innovation Constellation is testing out that concept.

"> Centre for Social Innovation, the Food Innovation Constellation is testing out that concept.

" />

From farm to (board room) table: pilot project aims to get fresh food into office buildings


Published:

Imagine a miniature farmers’ market that sells leafy heads of lettuce, fresh cheese and packaged meats inside your office space downtown. How convenient would that be? Located inside the Annex's Centre for Social Innovation, the Food Innovation Constellation is testing out that concept.

The group has just extended its farmer’s market pilot program for a further four months, wherein it intends to gauge interest from local office workers.

Aruna Handa, a convenor with the group, said it was a no brainer to continue pushing the farmer's market project.

“The market doubled in size and in revenue, so now we're going to spend more time templating the model, gathering resources and vendors and speaking to the downtown offices that have indicated interest for this program,” she says. “Eventually we want this to be self sustaining.”

Right as you walk inside the lobby at the CSI building, you'll notice a 10-metre stall full of fresh vegetables, chocolate and bread. During a typical lunch hour, workers from the CSI building queue up to sample local growers' produce.

Why? The food variety is abundant.

The bread hails from Nice Buns (try the fougasse) and the chocolate truffles from Boardwalk Chocolates (ask for the custom made truffles). There is also fresh produce from Fresh City Farms, while Earth and City makes soups and foods for home. Gabriela Ituarte's nixtamal tortillas are to die for.

According to the most recent report researched by the Canadian Institute for Environmental Law and Policy, the top three food retailers — Loblaws, Metro and Sobeys — supply approximately 78 per cent of the food distributed to consumers. That can make it hard for local growers to get their produce to consumers. No big surprises there, but this proved to be the catalyst for the farmers' market pilot.

Handa hopes the idea of a farmers' market will be have a ripple effect across the city's office locations and their lobbies.

“If we had better access and better food distribution, people could just grab it before their commute home — and less food equals less waste,” she says. “Do we want to choke on our scenery or eat our scenery?”

Edit Module

Join the conversation and have your say by commenting below. Our comment system uses a Facebook plugin. Please note that you'll have to turn off some ad-blockers in order to see the comments.

Edit Module

Follow us on Twitter @PostCity for more on what to eat, where to shop and what to do in Toronto.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

You may also like...

Asian fusion cocktail is the bee's knees at Chinatown's R&D

Asian fusion cocktail is the bee's knees at Chinatown's R&D

The cocktails are just as inspired as the food at R&D in Chinatown.
Posted 2 days ago
First Look: Rob Bragagnolo’s Campo Food Hall opens at King and Spadina

First Look: Rob Bragagnolo’s Campo Food Hall opens at King and Spadina

Toronto has suddenly joined the global food hall trend and Rob Bragagnolo (Carver) is one of the leaders of this revolution with Campo, recently opened at King and Spadina.
Posted 3 days ago
Toronto Neighbourhood Food Fight: Part Two

Toronto Neighbourhood Food Fight: Part Two

We scoured Toronto's best neighbourhood bites and put them head to head with the city's top-ranked foodie hot spots.
Posted 3 days ago
Toronto Neighbourhood Food Fight: Part One

Toronto Neighbourhood Food Fight: Part One

We scoured Toronto's best neighbourhood bites and put them head to head with the city's top-ranked foodie hot spots.
Posted 5 days ago
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleEdit Module