First Draught: Spirit Tree Draught Cider, a hard apple cider that stands out from the pack


Published:

 

There is a very wide gap between good and bad cider, with not very much in the middle. Unfortunately, too much of the latter finds its way onto bar tap lists simply because it’s an alternative to beer and it doesn’t have gluten.

Spirit Tree’s Draught Cider — made in large part from the apples grown by the cidery — is a stunning example of a delicious cider. It is miles away from the cloying sweetness of mass-market ciders, but it has a wider range than the bone-dry imports, plus a subtle hint of the funkiness that we find in some sour beers.

The cider pours a very light straw yellow with a bit of fizz that quickly dissipates. To me, the aroma is clean and balances apple blossoms with McIntosh apple peel, but if you’re the type who vacuums your way out of the house, you might detect a bit of a gym-sock funkiness.

The flavour opens with more McIntosh and a hint of sweetness that leads into a slightly sour finish. The tart aftertaste (like a very mild Granny Smith) lingers pleasantly. The tart-sour element means that this cider can include a bit of sweetness without being thrown out of balance.

The funkiness on the nose and the sourness in the finish are both by-products of the traditional English cider yeast that Spirit Tree uses to ferment the Draught Cider. There is some Brettanomyces in that blend, so this cider shares characteristics with many of the world’s most complex beers.

The current LCBO release has been quite popular, so depending on what part of the city you’re in, you may only be able to find it in a local pub. Luckily, it’s on tap at barVolo and a few other establishments around town.

The Draught Cider — along with Apelager Cider, Pear Cider, Estate Reserve Cider and Ice Cider — is also available at Spirit Tree’s cidery in Caledon.

Spirit Tree Estate Cidery’s Draught Cider, $14.15 for four 330 ml bottles, LCBO #338160

In addition to covering beer, new restaurants and food trucks for Post City, David Ort writes about food and drink for several Toronto publications including his own site, Food With Legs. He is also the author of the upcoming Canadian Craft Beer Cookbook. For more of his thoughts on food, beer and life in general, follow him on Twitter or get in touch at info@foodwithlegs.com.

Edit Module

Join the conversation and have your say by commenting below. Our comment system uses a Facebook plugin. Please note that you'll have to turn off some ad-blockers in order to see the comments.

Edit Module

Follow us on Twitter @PostCity for more on what to eat, where to shop and what to do in Toronto.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

You may also like...

Chef Alexandra Feswick throws an artsy dinner party with a feminist agenda

Chef Alexandra Feswick throws an artsy dinner party with a feminist agenda

The job is not only physically taxing, but can be emotionally demanding, too, especially when you end up in a kitchen run by a Gordon Ramsay–esque tyrant. Feswick weathered her share of sexist, macho bosses before helming the kitchen at the now-shuttered, then-raved about Brockton General. But even as a top chef, she felt a disrespect she attributes to her being a woman.
Posted 11 hours ago
Restaurant Review: Seafood abounds at Ardo, Corktown’s Sicilian eatery

Restaurant Review: Seafood abounds at Ardo, Corktown’s Sicilian eatery

Then there’s Ardo, the super-popular newish Sicilian restaurant in Corktown. It’s friendly and pleasant-looking, done in pale colours with warm lighting, Sicilian tchotchkes and a great buzz. Lots of people, lots of noise. And a few ringside bar seats overlooking the fast-moving and superbly fragrant open kitchen.
Posted 4 days ago
What to Eat this Minute: An uptown paradise for crème brûlée lovers

What to Eat this Minute: An uptown paradise for crème brûlée lovers

A menu of the available flavours sits next to the cash at Craque de Crème. Sweet-toothed patrons can order iterations of the dessert in everything from white chocolate rose to lychee vodka to, of course, a classic vanilla bean.
Posted 6 days ago
Looking Back: Toronto on rye

Looking Back: Toronto on rye

Now, the museum at Beth Tzedec Synagogue is hosting an exhibition called From Latkes to Laffas, celebrating the humble deli, which opened last month and continues until March 30, 2018.
Posted 1 week ago
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleEdit Module