Educator honoured with prestigious award

Florence Carter recognized for lengthy career and volunteering


Published:

Florence Carter has been called a pioneer by students and colleagues

85-year-old Florence Carter of Leaside was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal on Nov. 2, 2012 from the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) for her many achievements in the field of education for the blind. The Diamond Jubilee Medal exists to honour the outstanding contributions and achievements of Canadians. 60,000 Canadians were recognized with the medal in 2012, celebrating the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee year.

When Carter was younger, she dreamt of becoming a teacher. After she lost her vision at the age of 16, she thought that she would have to give up that dream — until she received training from the CNIB and went on to work as a rehabilitation teacher for the blind and partially blind.

Though she retired in the early ‘90s, she continued to volunteer with the CNIB and worked at Mohawk College with aspiring rehabilitation teachers. She also co-authored the first Canadian Braille textbook.

“I didn’t intentionally start out to make a name for myself or anything,” says Carter. “I just loved teaching.… I think sometimes a blind person learning from a blind person is a good experience.”

Join the conversation and have your say by commenting below. Our comment system uses a Facebook plugin. Please note that you'll have to turn off some ad-blockers in order to see the comments.

Edit Module

Follow us on Twitter @PostCity for more on what to eat, where to shop and what to do in Toronto.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

You may also like...

Thornhill anti-bullying advocate pays it forward

Thornhill anti-bullying advocate pays it forward

A Thornhill family has taken the painful experience of a childhood spent being bullied and turned it into a children’s book and a series of workshops and readings to educate kids on the dangers of bullying and to provide support for those who are suffering.
Posted 3 months ago
Erica Godfrey’s brainchild raises millions for Baycrest

Erica Godfrey’s brainchild raises millions for Baycrest

Godfrey sits on the board at Baycrest Health Sciences and came up with the idea for the Brain Project fundraiser after she was inspired by New York’s Fabergé Big Egg Hunt in 2014 — similar to Mel Lastman’s Moose in the City. It was launched for the second year at Nathan Phillips Square in July and consists of 100 large-scale sculptures of the human brain, designed by a multitude of artists, scattered across the city.
Posted 4 months ago
Richmond Hill couple helps Caribbean hospitals

Richmond Hill couple helps Caribbean hospitals

Posted 4 months ago
Police investigate ‘swatting’ in Rosedale

Police investigate ‘swatting’ in Rosedale

Posted 5 months ago
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module