The Price is Right Live, a watered-down touring version of the longstanding mid-day game show that rolled into the Molson Amphitheatre on Sunday. Not that it mattered one iota to the throngs of eager wannabe contestants on hand."> The Price is Right Live, a watered-down touring version of the longstanding mid-day game show that rolled into the Molson Amphitheatre on Sunday. Not that it mattered one iota to the throngs of eager wannabe contestants on hand." />

The Price is Right hits Toronto, proceeds to suck


Published:

 

There was something just a little off about The Price is Right Live, a watered-down touring version of the longstanding mid-day game show that rolled into the Molson Amphitheatre on Sunday. Not that it mattered one iota to the throngs of eager wannabe contestants on hand.

Outside of the iconic branding, a few familiar games and the ever-recognizable urging to “come on down,” there weren’t many elements that were consistent with the beloved show. For one thing, there was no Drew Carey — rather, a grating “tour host” was in his stead.

But even beyond the host, the show was clearly stripped-down in comparison to the TV show. The staging was surprisingly minimalist, with little glitz beyond a big “The Price is Right” banner and, of course, the presence of the signature wheel. For those contestants lucky enough to hear their names called, the prize offerings paled in comparison to those served up in the Burbank, California studios. Where prize packages on the TV program are routinely highlighted by cars or exotic vacations, Toronto participants couldn’t aspire to much more than a free fridge or kitchenware.

But you wouldn’t know it by the response of the spirited audience.

The 4,000 hopefuls on hand were colourful in more ways than one, donning a rainbow’s worth of bright shades and loud clothing. The traditional spirit of The Price is Right is distinctly kitsch, and the show’s Toronto fans responded accordingly. Ladies proudly exhibited shirts identifying themselves as “Barker’s Beauties” (the collective identity of the eye-catching models who display the show’s prize offerings, named so in association with former Price host Bob Barker), while men donned Maple Leafs jerseys for a clear Canadiana flavour.

The fans’ spastic responses were no different from what you’d see on TV, nor was the frantic energy during the Showcase Showdown and the fan favourite game of Plinko.

In short, an enthusiastic crowd made the most of the road show, even if the price wasn’t quite right.

Edit Module

Join the conversation and have your say by commenting below. Our comment system uses a Facebook plugin. Please note that you'll have to turn off some ad-blockers in order to see the comments.

Edit Module

Follow us on Twitter @PostCity for more on what to eat, where to shop and what to do in Toronto.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

You may also like...

Toronto Maple Leafs’ Zach Hyman on hitting the ice and the books

Toronto Maple Leafs’ Zach Hyman on hitting the ice and the books

Forest Hill native pens children's books when he's not playing hockey
Posted 3 days ago
Plan for eight-acre park in North York unveiled

Plan for eight-acre park in North York unveiled

Large development will have plenty of new amenities and a community centre
Posted 3 days ago
From Toronto the Good to Toronto, a Good Time

From Toronto the Good to Toronto, a Good Time

Mobile beer trucks could be coming to an arena parking lot near you
Posted 3 days ago
The top six things to do in Toronto this month

The top six things to do in Toronto this month

These fall events and attractions are fun for the whole family
Posted 5 days ago
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleEdit Module